February Book Picks

Happy Friday! We hope you all have had a great week (for some of you it was a short one). How about settling in for a new read this weekend?  These books are fairly new, but we feel well worth the wait if you plan to check them out at your local library.

The Fifth Petal by Brunonia Barry

From Amazon: When a teenage boy dies suspiciously on Halloween night, Salem’s chief of police, John Rafferty, now married to gifted lace reader Towner Whitney, wonders if there is a connection between his death and Salem’s most notorious cold case, a triple homicide dubbed “The Goddess Murders,” in which three young women, all descended from accused Salem witches, were slashed on Halloween night in 1989. He finds unexpected help in Callie Cahill, the daughter of one of the victims newly returned to town. Neither believes that the main suspect, Rose Whelan, respected local historian, is guilty of murder or witchcraft.

But exonerating Rose might mean crossing paths with a dangerous force. Were the women victims of an all-too-human vengeance, or was the devil raised in Salem that night? And if they cannot discover what truly happened, will evil rise again?

Our Thoughts: This is a mystery about the murder of three women on Halloween night, in 1989. The story is primarily told from the perspective of Callie who was a five year old witness to the murders, which included her mother. This is Brunonia Barry’s third book set in Salem. We both read one of her previous novels, The Lace Reader, and although there are a few recurring characters in this story, you don’t necessarily have to read it to understand this novel. We enjoyed the Salem setting as well as the history of the Salem Witch Trials. Although the book is 432 pages, it was a quick read.

The One in a Million Boy by Monica Wood

From Amazon:  The story of your life never starts at the beginning. Don’t they teach you anything at school?

So says 104-year-old Ona to the 11-year-old boy who’s been sent to help her out every Saturday morning. As he refills the bird feeders and tidies the garden shed, Ona tells him about her long life, from first love to second chances. Soon she’s confessing secrets she has kept hidden for decades.

One Saturday, the boy doesn’t show up. Ona starts to think he’s not so special after all, but then his father arrives on her doorstep, determined to finish his son’s good deed. The boy’s mother is not so far behind. Ona is set to discover that the world can surprise us at any age, and that sometimes sharing a loss is the only way to find ourselves again.

Our Thoughts:  This book is lovely, poignant and heartwarming.  Ona is a character that you learn to love her heart and her spunk.  And even at her age she is willing to try new things and change her life.  You learn about her life spanning 104 years.  The boy’s father has suffered an unimaginable loss and because he was not always the best father, he is determined to make amends for past mistakes.  I loved this book.  I first heard about it from the blog site Modern Mrs. Darcy (if you love books I recommend her site and also her podcast What Should I Read Next).

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

From Amazon:  He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility—a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel 

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery.

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.

Our Thoughts:  I was skeptical about this book before starting.  I mean, how much story can there be for a man held prisoner in a hotel?  Actually, a lot happens within the confines of this hotel over the course of several decades.  Due to people that come into his life in the hotel, the Count is challenged and grows.  I would call this a quiet book because it is very character driven without a ton of action.  However, the characters and the setting were so interesting that  I could not put this down.  It also helps that the book is well written.

Have a great weekend!

~May and June

A room without books is like a body without a soul.

Share this post
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
Comments are closed.

© 2016 May Meets June. All Rights Reserved.